Cottage Craft Works, LLC

Ph: 281-638-0050 | Visit www.cottagecraftworks.com


Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Manure Spreader handles fine practical saw dust and wood chip bedding

Horse ranch, poultry and other small animal owners rejoice!  Finally a compact manure spreader that will spread saw dust and wood chip bedding.

If you have given up on the hopes of a simple way to handle your sawdust and wood chip manure, take a look at the compact E-Z Spreaders from Cottage Craft Works .com



E-Z spreaders provide an optional litter pan that rides just under the spreader augers to pick up the fine practical material and spread it out evenly just  like a traditional spreader.

Most manure spreaders are built only to handle straw and hay bedding material.  The spreader beater augers are spaced out behind the spreader so that as the material comes out the back it is pushed into the augers and spread out.

The problem that farmers and ranchers face in using a traditional spreader for saw dust or wood chip bedding is that it clumps and falls off the back of the spreader before it can ever reach the augers.

The good news doesn't stop there.  E-Z spreaders are built by the Amish who have been making this line of spreaders for years and sold in the Amish communities.  They are all grown driven and equipped with rubber tractor tread tires. 


The 25 bushel or 35 bushel models are ideal for the small hobby farmer or small equestrian ranches, yet these spreaders are heavy built for hard use.  In fact these manure spreaders are so well built they can be shared or rented out to neighbors.

The Amish just build things to last.  No large corporate overhead or share holders they make things more heavy duty and use high quality parts.

Compare the specs on this little heavy duty spreader to the others on the market and you will quickly realize dollar for dollar the quality materials the Amish use to build them just can't be matched.

The overall weight is almost double of any other spreader in its class, yet it is built to balance heavy loads.

E-Z spreaders use 11ga steel while others are using thinner 13ga-14ga.  E-Z Spreader uses a 1-3/8" axle while others are using only a 1-1/4".  E-Z Spreaders use #50 T-Rod Web roller chain where the others use standard #50 and #40.

The two most popular 25 and 35 bushel spreaders come with a standard tongue that can hook on to a tractor, ATV or garden tractor with at least a 10 HP motor.

A standard hand crank trailer tongue jack is included to hitch a loaded spreader.

 The E-Z Model spreaders are still manufactured one at a time in a small Amish shop in Ohio.  The Amish build quality products with lower overhead, thus you are able to receive an old time American manufactured value product at a much lower price than you might expect.

The E-Z Model 25 has an overall length of 8’ and the E-Z Model 35 has an overall length of 9’. Both models are only 3’ tall for easier loading, and are only 60” wide to maneuver in between tight spaces in the barn.  The sides are durable powder coated steel, while the floor is equipped with tongue and groove poly recycled plastic lumber.

You won’t find E-Z spreaders online anywhere else but at Cottage Craft Works .com  The owners over at Cottage Craft Works have spent years cultivating business relationships with the Amish communities.

Their concept is simple, go deep into the Amish communities and find old fashioned American made products like things were made in the 1950s and bring them forward in today’s market place.

Now with over 5000 products strong and over 100 Amish shops you can take a refreshing trip back in history and find some of the old fashioned American made products that you may have remembered growing up with as a kid.  http://www.cottagecraftworks.com


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